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Week 1: Engines

​28 January to 1 February, 2018

Introduction:

Get dirty in the engine lab, or perform accurate computer simulations? Diesel, gasoline, or is there a better alternative?  Make your choice, join a team, and start making more efficient engines

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​Sunday

​Monday

​Tuesday

​Wednesday

​Thursday

 9:00 - 11:00 AM

Administrative​ Formalities​

Class 1: Gasoline Engine

Class 2: Diesel Engine​

Class 3: Spray Combustion​

Class 4: Engine Simulations​

11:00 – 12:00 PM

Introduction​

Lab project​

Lab project

Lab project​​

Lab project​​

12:00 – 01:00 PM

Lunch

Lunch​

​Lunch

​Lunch

Lunch​

01:00 – 05:00 PM

​Lab tour & Safety training

Lab project​

​Lab project

​Lab project

​Student Presentations

 


Safety training

  • Safety first! High pressure gases, flames, engines, labs can be very dangerous. Learn about safety procedures to do great science in a safe manner.
  • Emergency incident preparedness
  • Labe safety
  • Flammable liquids
  • Fire extinguisher

Classes

  • Class 1: Gasoline Engine
  • Class 2: Diesel Engine
  • Class 3: Spray Combustion
  • Class 4: Engine Simulations

Students Pre​​sentations

Time to regroup, show your accomplishments, and compete for the ENGINES best presentation award

LAB PROJECTS

  • Lab Project 1​ : AVL Engine

What’s the differences of in-cylinder combustion characteristics of low octane gasoline at CDC, PPC and HCCI conditions?

What's the differences of in-cylinder combustion characteristics of low octane gasoline at CDC, PPC and HCCI conditions?​

The advanced AVL Engine is an optical engine coupled with a high-speed color camera and used for in-cylinder visualization of combustion and the temporal and spatial distribution of pollutants. The students will learn the different combustion characteristics of conventional diesel spray-derived combustion (CDC) and advanced low-temperature combustion of partially premixed combustion (PPC) and homogeneous charge compression ignition (HCCI). The students will operate the Optical Engine under CDC, PPC and HCCI conditions.​

  • ​Lab project 2: CFR Engine​

How to determine the fuel octane number for different fuels?

How to determine the fuel octane number for different fuels?​

​CFR engine is a variable compression ratio engine used for almost a century to determine the octane rating of fuels. The students will learn how to run RON (Research Octane Number) and MON (Motor Octane Number) tests according to different procedures. Additionally, an introduction of the HCCI octane number will be included. The results obtained will be discussed and the students will conclude on the impact of these octane numbers for today's engines and fuels.

  • Lab project 3: Spray experiments


​An optically accessible, constant volume combustion chamber (CVCC) is available to reproduce temperature and pressure similar to those encountered in the compression stroke of an engine. The students will use a Phase Doppler Anemometry (PDA) to study the non-reacting, transient spray from a hollow-cone injector at pressure and temperature suitable to gasoline direct injection (GDI) engines. Measurements will be performed for two different fuels, and the results compared.   

  • ​Lab project 4: Engine simulations​

What are the in-cylinder temperature, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAHs) and soot particle distribution during the combustio
What are the in-cylinder temperature, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAHs) and soot particle distribution during the combustion process?​

Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) numerical simulation coupled with kinetic reaction mechanism complements experimental measurements by providing quantitative information on fuel oxidation and pollutant formation processes, especially for the evolution of soot particles. The students will learn how to setup a full cycle Engine simulation and the results will be shown and analyzed based on the previous simulations. ​

  • Lab project 5: Spray simulations


Simulations of a non-reactive spray will be performed using the open source OpenFOAM software for computational fluid dynamics (CFD).  Students will learn how to compile the code, set up a case and run the program.  Results obtained from the simulations will be post-processed using Paraview, a freely available and widely used post-processing tool, and the characteristics of the spray will be analyzed.  ​